Tag Archive | representative democracy

The Myth of American Self-Governance

Here in the United States, we are absolutely in love with this thing that we call “public property.” It sounds like such a great and noble idea–have the state take control of property and resources, and use them for the good of “the people.” Never mind that this is a verbatim description of socialism.

The Federal Government alone owns nearly 28% of all land in the United States, and much of it is in the west, where it owns nearly fifty percent. In Alaska, the situation is even worse, and the Federal Government owns nearly 90% of all land, even though, by all rights, the whole of Alaska was a private purchase. But never mind that, too. This handy resource incidentally lists “Public Land Ownership” by state.

“Public land ownership.”

If you add “state government land ownership” and “federal government land ownership” together for each state, you get figures that are absolutely shocking.

We colloquially call this stuff “public land,” in the same way that we say “We are the government.” After all, if the government owns all that land, and we are the government, then we own all that land. It’s a simple step of logic. Resting as it does on the assumption that “we are the government,” it would follow that, if it should turn out that we are not the government, then we do not own that land–some third party called “the government” does. So let’s move to Rothbard and have some logic dropped on the subject.

First, there is the argument of self-harm: if “we” are the government, then anything that the government does to us is considered voluntarily, and it is taken that we did it to ourselves. Quite to many people’s surprise, Hitler’s Nazi regime was democratically elected. By this reasoning–that in a democracy, “we are the government”–the Jews were not systematically murdered by the government. Instead, the Jews committed suicide.

This is not some word game. It is the logical conclusion of the fallacious notion that “we” are this third party entity that does stuff. Most assuredly, I am not the government. I have no hand in governance, and my votes to do so are routinely thrown away entirely. The people with government power–they are the government. Not you and me.

Then there is the argument of voluntary conscription. If “we” are the government, then if the government institutes conscription and sends many young men against their will to fight and die in foreign countries, then nothing untoward has happened. Because “they” are somehow the government, they weren’t conscripted; they volunteered to be sent, against their will, to foreign countries. I would hope it isn’t necessary to point out the absolute absurdity in saying that they volunteered to be forced to do something against their will.

Moreover, if the government criminalizes homosexuality, then the homosexuals who are arrested and imprisoned “did it to themselves.” After all, “they” are the government, so “they” somehow voted that they should be considered criminals and imprisoned against their wills.

It’s painfully obvious that we are not the government. In fact, this is so obvious that it wouldn’t be necessary to point out at all if this banality hadn’t propagated largely unchecked throughout western society. Those people who make up the city council? They’re not me. They and I are different people. Those people who make up the state legislature–they are not me. They and I are different people. Those people who wear badges and enforce the rules of the state and federal legislatures–they are not me. They and I are different people. We are not “them.” We are “their subjects.”

Representatives

“Fine,” the American liberal begrudgingly admits. “We aren’t literally ‘the government.’ But we do elect our representatives, who act in our best interests. Obviously, every single person can’t be their own government agent, and this is why representative democracy [what others would call “a republic,” of course] exists. So while you aren’t literally ‘the government,’ you are in control of it, because you pick your representatives.”

What a statement of astounding privilege. It must be nice to be so firmly within an ideological majority that one is assured representation among the government that rules us and that we have agreed “we are not.” Let there be no doubt: if you want to know what genuine privilege in the United States looks like, that is it–the notion that because we vote for our representatives we are represented.

As a Nietzschean Anarchist, I am an extreme ideological minority. In fact, I’m the only person I know who is a Nietzschean Anarchist. My ideal form of governance cannot be enacted by a third party representative, because the representative himself would be ruling me, and, as a Nietzschean Anarchist, I reject his authority to do so. So even if there were ten million other Nietzschean Anarchists out there, we could not be represented within the government, and the idea here is that if we do not think the governance system in place is compatible with our worldview, then we are not entitled to have the governance system that we want.

“Some exclusions apply,” would be a fitting end to the statement that “We elect our representatives.”

This state of affairs, where minorities of whatever flavor are not allowed a seat at the governing table, is entirely democratic–the rule by the mob, by the majority. Whoever has the most numbers makes the rules, and anyone who isn’t in that majority can get over it. Because I’m a minority of one, I am not entitled to self-governance as they are, and they are entitled to rule over me, whether I like it or not.

Already, the idea of “representatives” is on shaky ground. Some people have representatives. Have we not heard throughout the last 9 months that “Donald Trump doesn’t represent me”? Welcome to my world, where none of these people represent me. It doesn’t feel very good, does it, to be ruled over by someone with whom you disagree fundamentally? This is what you force upon me every time you elect your representative. You force me into the exact position that you are in right now because you are ruled by a government entirely controlled by Republicans. And those Republicans who felt this way in 2008, when President Obama was elected with a largely democratic congress–you are forcing upon liberals and people like me governance that we do not want. So it quite obviously isn’t “self-governance,” because it’s “governance by representatives.” And these representatives quite obviously do not “represent us.” They “represent some.” Those not represented… can just get fucked, as far as the ruling power is concerned, and this is ubiquitous throughout human history and American history, regardless of whatever political party or political ideology controlled the government.

As if all that wasn’t enough (which it should be), there is a deeper fallacy underlying the idea that, just because we can elect people to government, these people constitute “representatives” and are actually bound to do anything that we want them to do. Senator John McCain’s voting against the bill to “slim repeal” the Affordable Care Act is incontrovertible proof that “representatives” are what we already knew them to be–individuals with their own predilections, preferences, and concerns. They act in accord with our wishes only when our wishes overlap with theirs. It is a simple matter, when our desires conflict with theirs, to smooth over the matter and hold onto power anyway. If this was not true, then we would not have terrible approval ratings and such absurdly high re-election rates. While these ratings and rates are exaggerated on social media, there is still truth to them. As much as Mississippi despises Roger Wicker for being a typical neo-con, he’s not going anywhere.

As it happens, Rothbard also addressed the Representative Myth:

We cannot, in this chapter, develop the many problems and fallacies of “democracy.” Suffice it to say here that an individual’s true agent or “representative” is always subject to that individual’s orders, can be dismissed at  any time and cannot act contrary to the interests or wishes of his principal. Clearly, the “representative” in a  democracy can never fulfill such agency functions…

If these don’t sound like the “representatives” you think we have, then I would suggest the “representatives” that you think we have are not “representatives” as much as they are “people elected to power whose desires theoretically overlap with the electing individual’s to some degree, and, ideally, this overlap would cause the elected person to behave in a way the elector desires.”

In practice, however, the government and its members do, more or less, whatever they want. To restrain them, we produced a piece of paper and called it “The Constitution.” It is not “the highest law of the land” as people often suggest; it is more than that. It is the document that defined our government. It is the charter that defined our government. It is also completely meaningless today, with every single part of the Bill of Rights lying tattered and buried beneath 6,000 pages of legalese bullshit. Because if a judge can produce such an argument about how stopping and frisking people “totally” doesn’t violate people’s Fourth Amendment rights, then the government can freely violate the Fourth Amendment with impunity. The sheet of paper does nothing to stop them. It basically says “You must not do that.” Yeah, but they do that, so…

Back to Public Property

So if we are not “the government,” and if our representatives do not represent us, then what is the government? It is a cabal of people with the power to rule over us all. We are not those people, and those people only do what we want if it happens to coincide with what they want to do anyway. If this is sounding less and less like the “land of the free” that you think we’re in, I’d suggest that you probably attended a public school. Of course, their goal is not to create free-thinking, independent, autonomous citizens. That’s the last thing any government would want. Do you expect Wal-Mart to open up seminars and education programs on how to become self-sufficient? Of course not.

If this “government” is not us and is, in fact, some external thing that rules over us, then it follows that property it owns is not “public property.” It’s government property. If this was true, then we would expect the government to create all sorts of rules about how its property can be used, we would expect severe usage limitations on it, and we would expect it to use its enforcers–police–to ensure that “we the people” who allegedly “own” this property abide its rules and regulations. And, in fact, that’s exactly what we find.

Ostensibly, the American people are taxed to pay for roads that snake across the country. Supposedly, these roads belong to us, and we can use them as we want. Except that’s obviously not true, is it? Sobriety checkpoints, random insurance checkpoints, vehicular registration, drivers’ licenses, inspection stickers, and all kinds of other shit are required to use these roads that supposedly belong to us because we paid for them. And this state of affairs is supposedly okay because “we are the government,” so we imposed these rules on ourselves. Except we know this last statement is untrue, because we already proved it to be untrue. The government imposed these rules on us. It doesn’t matter if you agree with them or not–you didn’t impose them, and you cannot depose them if you have a change of heart.

Imagine that for a moment, if you truly think that we imposed these regulations on ourselves. Put yourself in the position of becoming a Mormon and having the epiphany that insurance is tantamount to gambling (which it is), and that you cannot, in good conscience, participate in the scheme (because it is a scheme–imagine if everyone was required to go to a casino and spend $100 in a slot machine every month knowing that “the house always wins”). What can you do about it? What can you do about it once you have decided that these laws imposed upon us are unjust?

Nothing.

Because you didn’t impose them, and you don’t control them. You are at their mercy, and the only reason this is somewhat escapable is because so many Americans reflexively have decided that the insurance scam is a positive thing (especially now that it has extended to health insurance scams).

This argument about “public property” applies to all public property. It’s a fiction. There is only personal property and state property, and we must stop confusing the two. If we understood that we are most certainly not “the government,” then this myth would have to fade, because it would become obvious that we and the government are entirely different things. We are the subjects of government.

Even if you agree with the Republican federal government, you are not governing yourself. You are being governed by other people, and you knew this eight years ago when you were pitching a fit because the Democratic federal government was governing you. You knew this to the extent that you flooded the White House website with secession petitions. And you, liberals, you know this now–you are not the Republican government, and neither are you represented by it. It rules over you, whether you like it or not.

And if you don’t obey, it will send its footsoldiers to kidnap you and imprison you against your will. If you resist this kidnapping, its footsoldiers will murder you. If you don’t respect its authoritah! to order you around and tell you what you can and can’t do, then it will send people to kill you. The bullshit lie that democracy and republic governments are somehow different, and that these truths are no longer truths.

We hold these truths to be self-evident–that all governments are created evil, that they are endowed by no one with the power to commit crimes without repercussions; that among these crimes are murder, assault, theft, and kidnapping.

#NotMyPresident

I think we have major problems, dudes. That is–I think the problems are more severe than I’ve been estimating, because I was just looking at pictures from the *sigh* protests and marches at Trump’s inauguration, the women’s march, and all the other things that liberals did over the weekend to make sure that we all knew that they are not happy, and it occurred to me. It’s been said before, but it really hit me as I was looking at the images.

These people… genuinely believe that “democracy” means they always get to be in charge. One of the signs I saw said “He doesn’t represent me!”

Welcome to my world, chick.

None of these people represent me. Trump doesn’t represent me, Hillary didn’t represent me, Johnson didn’t represent me, and even John McAfee didn’t represent me. But, and this is crucial, you don’t represent me, either. But it’s a sort of sense of… entitlement… isn’t it, to think that the president is even supposed to always represent you? Let’s return for a moment to the foundational ideas of our republic, and the folly that is having Representatives versus Direct Democracy.

Keeping things very simple, there are nine of us in our Republic. We have a Bill of Rights that means the Leader can and can’t do certain things, to protect any minorities from being oppressed by a majority. Cool, right? So even if five people vote for Bob, Bob can’t tell the other four to empty out their pockets and turn over all their possessions. There are limits, basically, to what Bob can do, even if he has the support of 8/9 of the voters.

In an ever-changing world, sometimes your group would win voting for Tim, and sometimes the other group would win voting for Bob. You don’t like Bob. You have serious issues with Bob’s positions. I understand. Believe me–I understand better than you think I do, because I have extreme concerns with the positions of every single politician who has ever been elected, and, regardless of who is elected, I never win. Liberals, of course, do get to win–they just spent eight years winning the presidency, basically.

But we can easily see that if there are two sides of an issue, then it’s ipso facto impossible for Bob to represent both sides. It’s sad that I have to point this out to people. Let’s take the abortion issue. If Bob is Pro-Life and wins the election with 5 votes, how asinine would it be for the four pro-choice people to declare, “Bob doesn’t represent us”? Well, no, of course he doesn’t. He doesn’t represent you because we have a representative government and your representative lost. The greater question is why in the freaking world you expect the candidate who represents the side that is opposed to you to represent you.

At some point in their city-centric and “higher education” indoctrination, some wires got mixed and their love for Socialism and the sharing that necessarily entails somehow didn’t get applied to sharing with… Well, people who disagree.

I had a fascinating exchange earlier with a full-blown SJW. This is the guy who made me aware that they have taken Empty sympathy and confused it with genuine empathy, when he stated pointlessly on Facebook that he felt bad for all the old women who won’t live to see the first female president, and I replied that I’d rather live in a world where the gender of the President is a non-issue.

Me: “Joke is on them. Barron is a billionaire kid who will grow up wiping his ass with toilet paper worth the bashers’ annual salaries.”

SJW: “He will grow up to be another billionaire corporatist who steps on the backs of labor for his selfish gains. But I agree while he’s a child he’s off limits. But as soon as he turns 18 I am gonna go nuts.”

Me: “That’s pretty judgmental.”

SJW: “You already judged all of the left just now [a fair point]. Hypocrite lol”

SJW: “and you already said it yourself. He will be a billionaire. And when someone like his father raising him who is a selfish narc, id say I’m spot on as to how he will turn out.”

Me: “I’ve written at length about the left’s hypocrisy, divisiveness, and judgmentalism. It’s a matter of record that these people were leftists. What has Trump done in the last year that was selfish?”

Me: “Point to any single act that Trump publicly undertook [that] brought no benefit to anyone but himself. After all, a selfish act must be one that benefits no one but the person taking it. If other people benefit, it cannot, by definition, be selfish. It can be mutualist, but not selfish.”

SJW: “not divesting himself of his business, constantly tweeting about on unfair it is that people protest, making every story about him. Are you kidding me? You hated Trump but now that he’s your Right wing president you are gonna sympathize? Typical partisan.”

^ Pay careful attention to that allegation that I’m being partisan.

SJW: “that’s where we differ in philosophy. Yes, a billionaire using cheap labor is selfish. So fuck off you libertarian property is a right BS.”

SJW: “this is why we probably can never be friends. We fundamentally disagree on what is ‘selfish.’ Your world views disgust me.”

Let’s take a brief moment, before continuing, because I didn’t do it earlier, to bask in how vitriolic and hateful this “tolerant” and “sympathy-driven” SJW’s words are. Never mind that he’s commented my status, right? Studies routinely show that liberals are more likely to unfriend people than conservatives, but the idea of allowing politics to get in the way of a friendship is ridiculous, but there’s an entire group on Facebook–the Pantsuit Nation–where people brag about doing just that, with friendship and filial relationships.

Me: “I’ve done nothing but criticize Trump. That you see neutrality as me siding with a President that I’m ideologically opposed to does, indeed, reveal your partisanism, and how you see the world in terms of Either/or, where anyone who challenges you on anything must be a Trump supporter. Tweeting is selfish?”

SJW: “and now you are defending him.”

SJW: “look at his fucking tweets!!!! It’s all about him are you blind?”

Side note here because I didn’t go into it in the thread, but… Who else would Trump be tweeting about? I probably have a worse ratio of “tweets about me” to “tweets about other people” than Donald Trump. I began to write the comment that I think he misunderstands the point of Twitter, because he seems to expect that people would not use social media to talk about themselves, which is especially funny since one of his most recent posts is that he’s leaving Facebook [again], but he hasn’t yet done so. Posting that you’re leaving, dude? Really? That’s at least as narcissistic as anything Trump has done.

Me: “[That] lengthy conversation we had–what happened to that?”

We had a very lengthy, hours-long conversation once about libertarianism and anarcho-capitalism, and I felt that I’d made a lot of progress with the guy, including giving him further reading. He appeared to be interested, and he was swayed by the arguments.

Me: “I am not defending him. I am asking you to show one selfish act that he’s done in the last year.”

SJW: “I decided that libertarianism is an excuse for greedy people. And he didn’t divest from his business. That’s selfish. Fuck off.

It’s really hard, at this point in a conversation, to remain calm and on target. I’ve been told to fuck off twice, I’ve been accused of partisanism because I asked him to substantiate his claims, and he waved off an entire ideology because he “decided” that it was an excuse for greedy people–which means, of course, that he is calling me greedy. It’s emotional drivel, through and through, and that’s all the more reason for me to overlook it and stay on point. So I did.

Me: “You decided that on what grounds?”

SJW: “bye.”

Me: “So I’m greedy?”

SJW: “yes u Are”

SJW: “You condone corporatism by supporting Trump”

Me: “I do not and have never supported Trump. I’ve asked you a simple question, and you still haven’t answered it. The fact that you confuse that as ‘supporting Trump’ is the exact partisanism you accuse me of.”

Me: “On what grounds do you accuse me of being greedy?”

Me: “https://anarchistshemale.com/2016/10/23/pro-corporation-or-pro-market/ You can accuse me of anything, but I can demonstrate otherwise. I advocate the market, not corporatism. I’d wager that I fight corporatism harder than you do. You just want to enslave the population and take stuff from people that you didn’t earn. That is what is selfish.”

Me: “Okay, so now that we’ve firmly established that I’m not and have never been a Trump supporter, and that I’ve been fighting corporatism probably longer than you, what is your justification for calling me greedy? That I believe stealing is wrong?”

There was no further reply from the SJW. I expected him to unfriend me and/or block me, but then he posted that he’s deleting his Facebook–and still hasn’t.

So congratulations, dude. You are part of the problem. Anyone who can read the replies of SJW above and think “yeah, that’s right! Tell her!” is a maniac. Blinded by socialist dogma wrapped up in SJW bullshit that has moved the goalpost from egalitarianism to special interest protections, a move that caused pushback from the right and gave us Brexit, Donald Trump, a bill to leave the UN, and the possibility of Italy leaving the EU. This trifecta that you have made of socialism, social justice, and centralized authority–people don’t want it.

People will accept egalitarianism when you show them the error of their ways. It is why I don’t want or need anyone’s help existing here in Bible Belt Mississippi. I am leaving, of course, but in the meantime, there is nothing that anyone can do that I can’t. These people don’t need to be forced to deal with me. They need to be shown that I’m just a normal person trying to go about my life, that I’m not getting in their way, that I’m not inhibiting what they want to do, and all I ask is that they not inhibit what I want to do.

Democrats and liberals–especially these younger ones who have just spent 8 years under a Democratic president–seem to be learning the painful lesson that, in a representative democracy, their representative doesn’t always win the election. And now they seem confused, perplexed, and angry that the person who represented other people isn’t representing them anyway. How important do they think they are? How entitled, how narcissistic, how self-engrandized must they be, to think that, “I know my representative didn’t win, and that the representative of these people opposed to me won, but goddamnit, the representative of the people opposed to me should represent me anyway, because I’m just that important! I matter more than they do!”

The people who were arrested for rioting in D.C. apparently face felony charges, which means that they’ll never be able to vote again, but a brief look at the numbers suggests that only one in three of the protesters actually voted anyway.

I’m worried that Trump will crack down heavily on that sort of thing–the violent protesting. Modern liberal hero Abraham Lincoln cracked down on peaceful dissent. Hell, Trump would be following in Lincoln’s footsteps precisely if he used the military to squash these little rebellions as they pop up. And then if California actually tried to secede, and he invaded? He’d be Lincoln Part 2. Lincoln was no fan of journalists, either, and had his fair share of editors arrested. He even had a senator deported. Lincoln was a bloody, vicious tyrant. But Democrats love them some Lincoln.

If they prick too hard at the state, it will strike back. It has always struck back. The United States Government has shown more restraint than many governments in the past, but it has also proven itself willing to do anything it takes to maintain its power–its law and order. If you go out disrupting that law and order, you better have a goddamned good reason, and you’d better be ready to fight the war that it will start.

That’s my issue with these protests, demonstrations, and marches. They’re pointless. They’re whines. We can thank Black Lives Matter for it in a lot of ways, because they enjoyed the media spotlight for years and never accomplished a single damned thing, because there was never an objective, no goal, no stated aims. The protests we’ve seen recently are exactly the same; they’re just wanton acts of destruction and loud, anguished cries of “We aren’t happy!” And they’re accomplishing exactly what one would expect incessant whining to accomplish: nothing.

Liberals, if you succeed in igniting a civil war–as you clearly want–you cannot possibly win. You do not have the popular support that you think you have, and your demonstrations have become passe, cliche, and tedious. We’re sick of it. When I say “we,” I mean average Americans. We’re fucking tired of it. It’s always this special interest group marching or demonstrating for some unstated reason, with no goal and no objective. It’s simply noise. Loud, annoying noise.

So no. I’m not the one who needs to fuck off.

Liberals do.

Return to the drawing board, stop running on pure emotion, think, and figure out what the hell it is that you want to accomplish. And then take steps to achieve that goal.

Hell, you guys can’t even do a women’s march properly! That’s how screwed up you’ve become! I’ve seen countless posts criticizing the fact that there were a lot of white women there. Are you kidding me? You racist assholes. I’m more impressed that all these people whose lives are so bad had the freaking money to go to D.C. and spend a day protesting… something…? Hell, I can’t afford to go to the A Perfect Circle concert and they’re my favorite band–that breaks my heart more than you know–and they’re coming within a hundred miles of me for the first time in 14 years.

Yep, but I’m greedy.

I really, really want to get started in on Donald Trump, who has already started killing people in Yemen, carrying on Obama’s drone policy. I’d really like to talk about how fucked up that is, how we shouldn’t be killing people, and how we should be absolutely horrified that our new president didn’t even make it a week before he had blood on his hands. But for fuck’s sake, liberals, between you and Donald Trump, you are the bigger problem. Your detachment from reality is so severe, and your reliance on your emotions so extreme, that I don’t think there’s anything that can be done to reach you.